Villages, Townships, and Towns of Lawrence County, Ohio – How They Got Their Names

Researched and Compiled by: Sharon M. Kouns
Last update: March 31, 1997

Note: This file will be updated as time allows and more research is found on the naming of our villages, townships, towns and early settlements. Many of the early settlements have been renamed over the years. — Sharon

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Aid Township
Aid Township was named by Mr. Haymaker, who wanted a short name as he expected to be Justice of the Peace of it. After the township was organized, he ran for Justice of the Peace and was beaten by Thomas Lambert. He said that if they would elect an old fool that could not write his name instead of an educated man, he would leave the county, and did so.

Arabia
Arabia, or as it is sometimes called “Bradshaw’s Mills,” has been laid out in town lots and will, it is presumed, assume the more romantic name of Rising Sun. We hope the Rising Sunners will have a big city and a railroad. If it beats Ironton the latter, out goes the county seat. Ironton Register, March 26, 1868.

Aaron’s Creek
Aarons Creek was named for Capt. Aaron, a white hunter who camped on it while Indians were still hunting here.

Bear Den
East of Vesuvius about one and a half miles. Famous in early history of Lawrence county for having been the location where the last bear was killed. (A full description was given in the Register some years ago – see if we can find it).

Bradrick
Bradrick is situated in Union Township. It was formerly known by the name of Indian Guyan, and was a river landing. It has long been a business locality. In an early day, many boats and barges were here. The lumber was obtained from a saw mill located a short distance up the Indian Guyan, and, also, one about three miles from the mouth of Symmes Creek. All traces of these mills have long passed away, and the generation who carried on this industry have gone to join the great majority. Iro

Bradshaw’s Mills
Arabia, or as it is sometimes called “Bradshaw’s Mills,” has been laid out in town lots and will, it is presumed, assume the more romantic name of Rising Sun. We hope the Rising Sunners will have a big city and a railroad. If it beats Ironton the latter, out goes the county seat. Ironton Register, March 26, 1868.

Burlington
The brick tavern at Burlington, was the first brick house. The first road surveyed was from Burlington to the mouth of Symmes.

California Rocks

Cannons Creek
Cannons Creek named for John Cannon who lived near its mouth.

Coalford
Former name of Sheridan.

Coryville (note Lawrence County has two Coryvilles)

Decatur Township
Decatur Township was named for the celebrated naval commander.

Delta
See Burlington for info on.

Devil’s Den
One mile from Sheritts. It was a noted scenery of Lawrence county. But we are glad to say, you can visit in safety as the Devil is never at home, for he always has business in other places.

Elizabeth Township
Elizabeth Township was named for Mrs. Elizabeth Hamilton.

Fayette Township
Fayette Township was named by Judges Miller and Davidson, who admired General De La Fayette.

Federal Creek
Federal creek was so called because Mr. Miller, who lived at the mouth was a Federalist.

Fleetwood Park
Need more information on.

Flemingsburg
Located just below Rockwood. Flemingsburg received its name from Fleming Booth, an old resident of that place, who was the blacksmith. It was an older town than Rockwood.

Getaway

Greasy Ridge
The Dingess, Spurlocks, David McComas and his brother went to their camp around the head of Indian Guyan and East Symmes in the winter of 1802 and they and everything about them, guns, dogs, and clothes were so greasy from eating bear meat that McComas called the ridge Greasy Ridge.

Hacker’s Hollow
(need more info on). Apparently it was located close to Vesuvius.

Hamilton Township
Hamilton Township was named for Robert Hamilton, an iron furnace man.

Hanging Rock
The first forge was at Hanging Rock, built by Andrew Ellison, James Rodgers and Robert Hamilton in 1830, and changed to the first rolling mill by Robert Hannah in 1840. The first foundry was built by Peebles, Wood & Co., at Hanging Rock in 1844. The Hanging Rock Railroad was commenced in 1846, finished in 1847, and the next year the locomotive Shawnee was placed on the track.

Hill’s Store
In 1838-1840 there were only six offices for mail between Guyandotte and Portsmouth, namely; Burlington, Hill’s Store, where Coal Grove now is, Hanging Rock, Haverhill, Franklin Furnace and Wheelersburg.

Ice Creek
Dr. Moore on Ice Creek wand Dr. Brown, on Paddy Creek were the first doctors in Lawrence county.

Ironton
Ironton is 540 feet above sea level. The latitude of Ironton is 32 degrees 22 feet and the longitude, 82 degrees 38 feet.

The ordinance to change the name of Olive Street to Park Avenue, was presented, and the Council promptly suspended the rules and passed it, by a unanimous vote. Petitioners asked that Sycamore St. be opened from 4th to Front, and the name changed, in view of the existence of another Sycamore St. in the West End. Ironton Register, July 26, 1888.

Edit: Ironton was named by Thomas Walton, whose family name was shortened from Wall-Town. He suggested Iron Town shorted to Ironton and John Campbell enthusiastically agreed. See article HERE.  – Nicole

Johns Creek
John Creek was named for Capt. John Smith, an Indian, who camped on it where Walter Neal lived.

Kouns Landing
Andrew P. Kouns. The first steamboat on the Ohio landed at Koun’s landing, and at no other point in the county.

LaBelle
Former name for Rome, in Rome Township. Ironton Register, December 12, 1895.

Lawrence County
Luther Blodget and Solomon Beckley were the first lawyers. Radey Root and Thos. Rose were the first school teachers in Lawrence county.
The first locomotive on the I. R. R. was the Essex in 1851.
By 1888 there were 145 school houses in Lawrence county. The average wages of school teachers in Lawrence county were $40 for gentlemen and $34 for ladies; in the state $37 for gentlemen and $26 for ladies.
The largest vote ever cast in this county prior to 1888 was in 1883, when it footed up 8056. Lawrence county has 61,000 acres of cultivated land. From 1858-1888, the valuation of real estate in Lawrence Co. doubled – from $2,487,638 to $5,191,746.

Lawrence Township
Lawrence Township was named for the County.

Lick Creek
Lick Creek received its name from a large deer lick situated near the Sheridan mines.

Manhattan

Mason Township
Mason Township was named for the Free Masons, as the old lodge was opposed to the Anti-Masons.

Millersport
Millersport was named by Thos. Walton for Jacob Miller.

Paddy Creek
Named for Dr. Paddy Brown, who built a pawpaw cabin at its mouth. Dr. Moore, on Ice Creek and Dr. Brown, on Paddy were the first doctors in Lawrence county. Dr. Brown was the first doctor in the county.

Perry Township
Perry Township was named for Commodore O. H. Perry.

Pine Creek
Pine Creek named for Capt. John Pine who had his camp at the forks of the creek in the edge of Lawrence county.

Proctorville
Proctorville is located twenty two miles above Ironton and is on the Ohio river almost opposite the old town of Guyandotte. The village was named for Jacob Proctor.

Quaker Bottom
Some of the earliest settlers of Quaker Bottom were “In 1796 John Phillips, Jesse Baldwin and family, members of the Friends from Westfall, North Carolina; Phineas Hunt and his family, all members of the society of Friends except himself (and he soon became a member) moved to the Virginia side of the Ohio River. In the latter part of the year 1797, Jesse Baldwin, after raising some corn opposite Green Bottom, moved some eighteen miles down the Ohio and settled in what is now called Quak

Rankin Creek
Rankin Creek was named for Hiram Rankin who first built a cabin near its mouth at the south end.

Rising Sun
Arabia, or as it is sometimes called “Bradshaw’s Mills,” has been laid out in town lots and will, it is presumed, assume the more romantic name of Rising Sun. We hope the Rising Sunners will have a big city and a railroad. If it beats Ironton the latter, out goes the county seat. Ironton Register, March 26, 1868.

Rockwood
Rockwood received its name by company vote. Rockwood was founded on part of a tract of 445 acres, owned by the Rockwood Mining Co. The company consisted of ten members, each of whom is commemorated in the records by having a street named after him.

Rome
Rome, now called LaBelle, in Rome Township. Ironton Register, December 12, 1895.

Rome Township
Judge E. B. Green and Esq. Joel Bowen had the naming of Rome Township. Bowen wanted it called Bowenville; Green proposed to cut a piece out of a rough pumpkin and throw heads and tails, this was done. Green prepared the piece, left the oval green side on and the bottom flat, threw it up and chose the green side. The oval side made it come up three times, and he named it Rome; he had just been reading the history of Rome.

Russell’s Place
Once owned by Frank Russell, who owned the store, the tan yard, the mill, the farm on which the village now stands – everything was directed by him. Now known as Getaway. The village of Getaway was first called Unionville and then Russell’s Place. In recent years, however, it has been generally known as Getaway.

Salliday
Salliday was named after a man who lived there for a number of years. Today it is known as Solida.

Sheridan
Sheridan Coal Works. The Sheridan Coaling Co. was first organized in 1864, under Bimpson and Nigh. A short time after, Charles Kingsbury, fresh from the war and full of enthusiasm over the fame of Gen. Sheridan, with Mr. Bimpson’s consent, named the place Sheridan. It had formerly been called Coalford. This famous vein of coal was first discovered by L. R. Chatfield, who lived a few miles up Lick Creek.

Sherritts

Storms Creek
Strums now called Storms Creek was named for a Pennsylvania Dutch hunter, who camped at its mouth and hunted for bear in the back hills and carried the hides to Pittsburgh annually. The first church was a Baptist church near the mouth of Storms Creek. The first preaching was by Robt. Scott in 1802.

Strums
Strums now called Storms Creek was named for a Pennsylvania Dutch hunter, who camped at its mouth and hunted for bear in the back hills and carried the hides to Pittsburgh annually.

Symmes Creek
Symmes Creek was named for John Cleves Symmes. The first and only salt well from which salt was made was on Symmes Creek, in Windsor Tp., in section 31.

Symmes Township
Symmes Township formerly included most of Symmes Creek and its tributaries, and was named for it.

Two Mile
The first Methodist chapel was built in 1820, at mouth of Two-Mile.

Union Furnace
In 1826, James Rodgers, John Means, John sparks and Valentine Fear built Union furnace, the first in the county.

Union Landing
In 1797, the Kelleys came and settled in the neighborhood of Union Landing. Rev. John Kelly built the first horse mill near Union Landing.

Union Township
Union Township was named by the Jackson men who believed that Calhoun, the Nullifier, should be hung.

Unionville
The village of Getaway was first called Unionville and then Russell’s Place. In recent years, however, it has been generally known as Getaway.

Upper Township
Upper Township was the Upper Township in Adams County, Ohio, and afterward in Scioto County. When Lawrence was taken from Scioto and Gallia County, it retained the name.

Vesuvius
Vesuvius was formerly known as Wild Cat. It received the latter name from the great number of these animals which infested the region in its earlier days. It is located on Storms Creek.

Washington Township
Washington Township was named for General Washington.

Wild Cat
The former name of Vesuvius. It received its name from the great number of wildcats which infested this region in its earlier days. It was located on Storms Creek.

Wilgus
Wilgus P. O. is situated at a junction of roads, from which more than 35 families receive their mail. Ironton Register, March 31, 1892.

Windsor Township
Windsor Township was named by Esq. Peter Wakefield for Windsor, Vermont. He was the first Justice of the Peace in it and held the office, while he lived.

Misc.
Ironton Register, Thursday, April 10, 1851

 

Compiled by Sharon M. Kouns.

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File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by
Sharon M. Kouns
historical@wwd.net
March 31, 1997
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